• lolcatnip
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    1 month ago

    Office lights tend to be a lot more blue than what’s used in homes.

    • Tlaloc_Temporal@lemmy.ca
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      1 month ago

      That’s true. Office fluorescents are often a very clinical and harsh tone.

      Maybe it’s something to do with the breadth of the spectrum? Are some eyes better at utilizing a wife spectrum even if the intendity is lower, while other eyes care prinarily about the maximum intensity?

      Or maybe it’s something to do with exposure? Some people can’t see the intensity difference between spill light from outside and dedicated room lights because their brain adjusts the effective exposure differently?

      Maybe it’s overexposure filtering. Some people get headaches from brighter light but don’t notice the brightness because of all the extra work their visual cortex is doing to filter out the extra light, while other people genuinely need the extra intensity?

      • lolcatnip
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        1 month ago

        I’d be really surprised if people who have a neurological abnormality also happen to have a difference in eye anatomy, especially when the neurological anomaly is associated with other sensory processing issues. Occam’s razor suggests that all the sensory processing issues NNT people have are a result of their brains being different.

        • Tlaloc_Temporal@lemmy.ca
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          1 month ago

          Is it possible that the sensory processing differences are caused by the difference in retina cells? That the cerebellum develops differently to deal with different inputs and thus behaves differently elsewhere?

          I find it hard to imagine that the difference between needing the room lights because it’s too dark and only noticing the shift in colour temperature is just due to visual processing. If the eyes are the same, why can some people see well and others less so?

      • Tobberone@lemm.ee
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        1 month ago

        Apparently all eyes are not created equal in ability to transfer light to the retina. Some has narrower or wider fields of vision as well. So, where your eyes may be well adapted to low light levels, others may not be. In a world with no artificial shadows and the sun high on the sky for most of the year, being able to filter out sun light might have been a pro, while now needing lots of artificial lights to see straight.

        • yokonzo@lemmy.worldOP
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          1 month ago

          I mean as far as I understand it for me, being heavily ADHD, it’s a sensory thing, i feel overloaded and overwhelmed when that light is on me, like it blasting me with it’s energy. I also cannot be touched when I feel greasy (after eating greasy foods for example)

          It’s just too much for me to handle

          • Tobberone@lemm.ee
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            1 month ago

            I did not in any way mean to suggest sensitivity is not a factor, only to suggest that light sensitivity may be more of a spectrum and that there are persons living in a darker world than others. So, it may not be a person on the top of the bell curve that need more light, but someone on the other end of the spectrum entirely.

            Since the top comment in this thread was about needing more light in an already bright room i meamt to say that there might be reasons why people around us prefer 1 or 100000 lumen…