• jnk@sh.itjust.works
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    2 months ago

    Everything is open source for this guy after using this simple trick. Big techs HATE him!

    • DeathsEmbrace@lemmy.ml
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      2 months ago

      Imagine getting a big enough resume to get jobs at any company just so you can do this one neat little trick.

      • Potatos_are_not_friends@lemmy.world
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        2 months ago

        NGL I apply to places where I use the software. But it’s not one thing, it’s a dozen things I would fix.

        I actually never successfully got the job. Probably because during the interview, I come off like a rambling psychopath pointing out extremely specific things.

        • CaptDust@sh.itjust.works
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          2 months ago

          Part of my previous company’s hiring process included having the candidate use our software, then asking what they thought of the experience and what improvements they thought would have the most impact. It wasn’t entirely useful because devs weren’t in control of prioritizing changes, but it was always interesting to see which pain points stuck out to the candidate.

          • flambonkscious@sh.itjust.works
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            2 months ago

            This strikes me as a really good idea… If they come up with batshit insane things, or obviously can’t click straight, it’s a good indicator.

            • CaptDust@sh.itjust.works
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              2 months ago

              It does give some insight into how people think. Some people are bothered with UI events and placement, others wanted to reduce the bandwidth it required, we had one girl who approached it focused on the accessibility of the software, and unfortunately for us support was abysmal. You also need thick skin to invite random joe off the street to tell you how your software sucks.

      • InfiniteWisdom@sh.itjust.works
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        2 months ago

        Honestly, anybody with a gender studies degree can get into software developer nowadays no sweat, nowadays the fortune 500 standards are so low that they’ll just hire anyone on the spot without even questioning it. Honestly only started to take note of this the second Biden got into office, the quality of software overall has gone down. Overall, back to open source, I never truly got the open source movement in general, never been my thing. Proprietary software is inheitly more secure which is why most enterprise systems still use windows xp.

    • Sorse@discuss.tchncs.de
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      2 months ago

      More like source available, since you can’t use the code in your stuff without the permission of the company 🤓

  • hsdkfr734r@feddit.nl
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    2 months ago

    Let the patch be part of the code for one or two minor releases. Then revert the changes of the patch.

  • PenisWenisGenius@lemmynsfw.com
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    2 months ago

    inb4 they wait until his last day then roll back the changes because functional code/unauthorized changes are against company policy and actually they need that bug to slow down the user so they don’t click so fast the database crashes.

  • Hootz@lemmy.ca
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    2 months ago

    Always love this one, I’d do the same but there’s to many fucking things to fix.

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        2 months ago

        I would but due to capitalism there’s not much of a choice in products.

        I hate when companies just eat an entire industry.

          • Hootz@lemmy.ca
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            2 months ago

            Soda and soda accessories.

            I’m a Bev tech, there’s two companies that make bar guns, tapright and multiplex aka wunderbar. There’s more options for fountain dispensing but most of my work is bars and restaurants.

            Also AMA about soda dispensing at bars.

            • dejected_warp_core@lemmy.world
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              2 months ago

              Also AMA about soda dispensing at bars.

              It’s been ages since I worked in a restaurant. IIRC, I never saw that place purge or clean the soda lines. And there was a LOT of plumbing between the fountains and the back where the syrup was kept.

              At the risk of making everyone re-think ever eating out again: how often do establishments do that kind of maintenance? And is that within the recommended manufacturer interval?

              • Hootz@lemmy.ca
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                2 months ago

                Oh my the scary question.

                Most places legit never do unless there’s a problem. When I do service I’ll usually flush what is needed but I don’t have time for a full cleaning since the customer is supposed to do that.

                Corporate chains tend to have actual SOP so they tend to be cleaner in general and will have their lines cleaned more often.

                I generally suggest every 4 weeks, and to do it when a box needs to be changed since you are only gonna be flushing the last bit of an old box out of the lines. Luke warm water in a 5 gallon pail and you dunk your qcds with the caps off, run the gun or fountain till it’s clear then start mashing the buttons to get any bits stuck in the line. Pull the qcd from bucket then put cap back on, reattach to box and run gun/fountain till product is running properly.

                Tbh, it’s not the lines you gotta worry with soda it’s the gun itself, some places never clean the nozzles and they get gross. Also most of the time any bad tastes are related to water or a bad syrup ratio. I had someone call me saying their lemon lime tasted “dirty” it was a bad ratio, took me not even 5 min to fix.

                I’d worry more about the beer though that’s a whole different beast. Lines should be done every two weeks, once a month at the very least. That shit will make you sick if it’s dirty enough, I’ve seen so horrid things related to beer.

            • laughterlaughter@lemmy.world
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              2 months ago

              Thanks!

              Heh, well, here’s a question: what type of software is missing in this industry that would make a killing in profits, if developed?

              • Hootz@lemmy.ca
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                2 months ago

                I’d say an app or service that allows restaurants and bars to connect with local independent bar and soda techs to request services. Has the ability to track calls, submit invoices and collect payment along with maybe being able to order from suppliers

                There’s alot of places that have no idea who to call for issues relating to that stuff especially with how often staff turns over.

  • JCreazy@midwest.social
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    2 months ago

    It seems like I’m constantly finding bugs in businesses’ apps. Do they not have people test them?

    • jol@discuss.tchncs.de
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      2 months ago

      They do, and they have a backlog of hundreds of issues to fix and they must prioritise then. If fixing a bug doesn’t make money, it’s not priority.

      • Lost_My_Mind@lemmy.world
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        2 months ago

        I hate how they’ll spend 4 years squashing all the bugs…and then they cancel the software, and release a new buggy version.

        • KillingTimeItself@lemmy.dbzer0.com
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          2 months ago

          i will never forgive the emby team for creating the single most idiotic (although rather funny) transcoding system.

          It has a resolution selection, along with a bitrate selection, so you would think it forces transcoding.

          It turns out the resolution is actually just a suggestion, and the bitrate is what it targets, if it doesn’t meet the bitrate, it will transcode, and if you get lucky, it might transcode to the specified resolution.

      • bitchkat@lemmy.world
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        2 months ago

        I am steadfast that I will occasionally take some time and kill off some low hanging fruit. For me, its kind of like a break and lets me clear my head on the bigger issues.

        • jol@discuss.tchncs.de
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          2 months ago

          Even then, there are bugs that need multiple people (design, engineering, content, QA, etc) and are not something that can be fixed on a whim.

            • jol@discuss.tchncs.de
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              2 months ago

              The problem is that what users consider low hanging fruit is often not, and what is low hanging fruit for devs, is invisible stuff that users don’t notice. The intersection is the tastiest low hanging fruit, but as such it’s also rare and easily picked by anyone.

              • bitchkat@lemmy.world
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                2 months ago

                I never said that users were involved in this. This is just grabbing some bugs off the queue that are simple to fix but have been deprioritized by project manager.

                But they do make the customer happy because they are the one that submitted the bug.

    • vithigar@lemmy.ca
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      2 months ago

      As someone in the dev team for a “business app”, we probably know about most or all of them, but they’re just not important enough for anyone in management to prioritize them as part of a sprint. It’s also possible no one has given us reproducible steps to make them happen, so we just straight up don’t know what to fix. Usually the former though.

    • mrkite@programming.dev
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      2 months ago

      I would fix that bug but the complete rewrite that management has had me working on for the past two years will make it obsolete anyway.

    • Andrenikous@lemm.ee
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      2 months ago

      Sometimes. Other times they layoff the QAs and anyone else whose job is about quality.

    • douglasg14b@lemmy.world
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      2 months ago

      They usually do yes however it’s all about prioritization.

      You may have hundreds or thousands or open requests and issues.

      With tens of thousands of closed issues that were either not reproducible, not actually problems, or largely indecipherable.

      There’s usually a feature roadmap which is where most of the development money and time is spent. If it’s an older business application then certain bugs might easily take weeks to find, fix, test, validate, go through user acceptance, A/B test, and then deploy. But fixing is expensive work, so if the bug isn’t severe it’s usually deprioritized next to higher priority work.

  • cumskin_genocide@lemm.ee
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    2 months ago

    Bro that reminds me when I was in university and I used to tutor fellow students with the goal of getting laid. As soon as I got laid I stopped tutoring. Now unfortunately I’m married and have kids because of that.

  • bulwark@lemmy.world
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    2 months ago

    Reminds me of when my breaks started failing on my 1990 Chrysler LeBaron so I got a job at a break repair place long enough to fix them then I quit.

  • Haus@kbin.social
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    2 months ago

    ESR: “Every good work of software starts by scratching a developer’s personal itch.”